Veteran’s Day

November 11 is Veteran’s Day.

In November 1919, President Wilson proclaimed November 11 as the first commemoration of Armistice Day with the following words: “To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations…”

Soldiers of the 353rd Infantry near a church at Stenay, Meuse in France.

Soldiers of the 353rd Infantry near a church at Stenay, Meuse in France, wait for the end of hostilities. This photo was taken at 10:58 a.m., on November 11, 1918, two minutes before the armistice ending World War I went into effect.
Photo courtesy US Dept. Veteran’s Affairs

An Act (52 Stat. 351; 5 U. S. Code, Sec. 87a) approved May 13, 1938, made the 11th of November in each year a legal holiday—a day to be dedicated to the cause of world peace and to be thereafter celebrated and known as “Armistice Day.” Armistice Day was primarily a day set aside to honor veterans of World War I, but in 1954, after World War II

My dad (the one w/ the puppy)
proudly served in the Navy during
WWII

had required the greatest mobilization of soldiers, sailors, Marines and airmen in the Nation’s history; after American forces had fought aggression in Korea, the 83rd Congress, at the urging of the veterans service organizations, amended the Act of 1938 by striking out the word “Armistice” and inserting in its place the word “Veterans.” With the approval of this legislation (Public Law 380) on June 1, 1954, November 11th became a day to honor American veterans of all wars.

To all the many men and women who are serving, and who have served, in our

My brother during basic training, Viet Nam era.

armed forces throughout the history of the United States of America, thank you so very much.  Your dedication, sacrifice, and honor, and that of your families, are greatly appreciated.

I, indeed, salute you.

Several years back, Pilot and I heard Cherryholmes sing this powerful song in concert. This is My Son.

I wish you well,

Sandy

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Pat

This was a powerful song, it was also a great reminder. Thank you Sandy.

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