Thankful Heart

courtesy pixabayby Sandy Kirby Quandt

What are you thankful for on this day set aside in the United States as a day of Thanksgiving?

The old song told us to count our many blessings, naming them one by one. How long has it been since we actually took the time to do just that? 2016 is rapidly drawing to a close, so now might be a perfect time to take up pen and page, or computer, and start a list.

Look back over the previous months. What do you have to be thankful for? Start a list. courtesy pixabayWrite it down. As you write from a thankful heart, thank God for what he has done, is doing, and will do.

Thank God for the things he gave you, and the things he withheld.

One of the things I am thankful for is you. Those of you who take the time to read what God gives me to write. I’m thankful for your comments that add to our conversation. I’m thankful for your support in my writing journey and your encouragement.

Don’t just focus on what some might call major “Yay, God” moments alone, such as healing from serious illness. But focus on what some might call the common everyday things as well. Thank God for the pastel palette of colors in each sunrise and sunset. The laughter of a child. The presence of a friend. Gas in the car. Heat in the house. Food on the table.

courtesy pixabayBe thankful for the things we sometime dismiss and overlook. They are all gifts from a God who loves us with an everlasting love.

We appreciate others expressing thankful hearts to us, right? Don’t you think God does too?

Leave a comment below to share your thoughts on the subject. If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

Shout with joy to the Lord, all the earth! Worship the Lord with gladness. Come before him, singing with joy. Acknowledge that the Lord is God! He made us, and we are his. We are his people, the sheep of his pasture. Enter his gates with thanksgiving; go into his courts with praise. Give thanks to him and praise his name. For the Lord is good. His unfailing love continues forever, and his faithfulness continues to each generation. Psalm 100 (NLT)

Happy Thanksgiving!

I wish you well,

Sandy

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Thankful

courtesy pixabayby Sandy Kirby Quandt

Thanksgiving blessings to one and all.

May each of us take the time during this day set aside in America to give thanks to the Maker and Creator of every good and perfect gift.

courtesy pixabayWhether we are gathered together in a large group or we are spending the day alone, I pray each of us reflects on what God has given us, brought us through, blessed us with, and thank him for his mercies which are new every morning.

May we also reflect on how we can be a blessing to others, how we can give back, how we can make the world a little brighter as we journey through it.

courtesy pixabay

Thank you, dear readers, for faithfully joining me on this journey. I appreciate you and thank God for each and every one of you who takes the time to read what God gives me to write.

I pray Woven and Spun touches you in a special way, draws you closer to God, blesses and encourages you to keep fighting the good fight.

Peace.

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Come, let us praise the Lord! Let us sing for joy to God, who protects us! Let us come before him with thanksgiving and sing joyful songs of praise. For the Lord is a mighty God, a mighty king over all the gods. He rules over the whole earth, from the deepest caves to the highest hills. He rules over the sea, which he made; the land also, which he himself formed. Come, let us bow down and worship him; let us kneel before the Lord, our Maker! He is our God; we are the people he cares for, the flock for which he provides. Psalms 95:1-7 (GNT)

I wish you well.

Sandy

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One of my posts will appear on Inspire a Fire December 1, 2015. Please stop by.

Sunday Scriptures — Gratitude Not Unforgiveness

Isaiahby Sandy Kirby Quandt

Thanksgiving is only a few days away.

With the day often comes family and friends. For some that is a good thing. For others it isn’t.

While some folks celebrate the day with gratitude and thankfulness, some folks spend the time together in unforgiveness rehashing past transgressions, wounds and hurts.

When I taught elementary school one thing I liked to do as a pre-Thanksgiving craft was have each child spread out the fingers of their hand and trace around them.

If you use your imagination, this looks like a turkey. Construction paper feathers of multiple colors were glued to the four fingers. An eye was drawn on the thumb, or turkey’s face. On each feather was written a different thing the child was thankful for. These turkeys were presented to family members on Thanksgiving Day.

Might I suggest instead of coming to Thanksgiving with thoughts of unforgiveness in our hearts, we make hand turkeys and fill them with thoughts of gratitude to distribute to those we’ll spend Thursday with?

Is there a special way you show your gratitude to those in your life?

Leave a comment below to share your thoughts on the subject. If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

Since God chose you to be the holy people he loves, you must clothe yourselves with tenderhearted mercy, kindness, humility, gentleness, and patience. Make allowance for each other’s faults, and forgive anyone who offends you. Remember, the Lord forgave you, so you must forgive others. Colossians 3:12-13 (NLT)

I wish you well.

Sandy

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Thanksgiving, Not Just A Once A Year Thing

By Sandy Kirby Quandt

Here in the United States, today is the day set aside as a day of Thanksgiving.  All through the Bible we read of times of praise and thanksgiving. Not just once a year. It was a continual occurrence. I believe the same should hold true for us. I believe we should have thankful hearts every single day of the year.

During the time of King David, the sacred Ark of the Covenant was captured by the prayingPhilistines. When it was returned to the Tabernacle, David wrote a song of thanksgiving to the LORD.

On that day David gave to Asaph and his fellow Levites this song of thanksgiving to the LordGive thanks to the Lord and proclaim his greatness. Let the whole world know what he has done. Sing to him; yes, sing his praises. Tell everyone about his wonderful deeds. Exult in his holy name; rejoice, you who worship the Lord. 1 Chronicles 16:7-10 (NLT)

Many of David’s psalms expressed his gratitude to God for who God was, and what he had done.

 Oh, how grateful and thankful I am to the Lord because he is so good. I will sing praise to the name of the Lord who is above all lords. Psalm 7:17 (TLB)

In the New Testament, the Apostle Paul eloquently expressed how grateful we should be empty tomb2for the victory we have over death because of Jesus’ victory over death.

 So when this takes place, and the mortal has been changed into the immortal, then the scripture will come true: “Death is destroyed; victory is complete!”

 “Where, Death, is your victory?
Where, Death, is your power to hurt?”

Death gets its power to hurt from sin, and sin gets its power from the Law. But thanks be to God who gives us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ! 1 Corinthians 15:54-57 (GNT)

Finally, Paul again tells us to be thankful…all the time. Even when we are going through tough times.

Whatever happens, keep thanking God because of Jesus Christ. This is what God wants you to do. 1 Thessalonians 5:18 (CEV)

What do you think?

I’d love to hear your thoughts on the subject. Leave a comment below. If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

I wish you well.

Sandy

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Sunday Scriptures — Enter His Gates

Isaiah 40Come into his (God’s) city with songs of thanksgiving and into his courtyards with songs of praise.Thank him and praise his name. The Lord is good. His love is forever,and his loyalty goes on and on. Psalm 100:4-5

Here in the States, we are getting ready to celebrate Thanksgiving. It has always been a puzzlement to me, that one day is set aside to give thanks, when in my mind, we should give thanks every day. Am I the only one who feels that way? I hope not.

While I definitely do not want to eat, or prepare, the large amounts of food that are consumed on Thanksgiving every day, I believe we should celebrate the giver of those gifts every day. Just as God doesn’t withhold his blessings and save them up to dispense on just one day of the year, I don’t believe we should save up our thanksgiving, and dispense it on just one day of the year, either.

Come before him every day with thanksgiving and praise.

I wish you well.

Sandy

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Thanksgiving 1621

What many of us in America have grown up believing about Thanksgiving, may not be altogether correct.

We know that in 1939 Franklin Delano Roosevelt declared Thanksgiving for the next-to-the-last Thursday in November. Two years later, in 1941, Congress permanently established the holiday as the fourth Thursday in the month.

But as James W. Baker states in his book, Thanksgiving: The Biography of an American Holiday, “despite disagreements over the details” the 3-day event in Plymouth in the fall of 1621 was “the historical birth of the American Thanksgiving holiday.”

One place that tries to sort out the myth from reality, is a place I would someday like to visit. Plimoth Plantation in Plymouth, MA.

Thumbnail for version as of 14:04, 18 December 2011

Photo Wikimedia

According to 1621 A New Look At Thanksgiving written by Catherine O’Neill Grace and Margaret M. Bruchac with Plimoth Plantation, when the Wampanoag People brought food to a three day feast with the English settlers, who were living on Wampanoag land, in 1621, they probably brought with them food from the sea. Mussels. Clams. Fish. From the fields they probably brought deer and fowl, possibly turkey. From the ground they probably brought “sukahtash”; corn and beans, berries, nuts, squash, and pumpkins.

File:EasternWildTurkey.jpg

Photo Wikimedia

The English had gone “fowling”, and may have brought ducks, geese, and swans. They may have brought turkeys, as well.

While there were cranberries and pumpkins available, there was no cranberry sauce, and no pumpkin pies. There wasn’t any sugar for those two dishes, and sweets weren’t that common. Potatoes were not grown in New England at the time, so no mashed pots and gravy.

For Thanksgiving dinner at our home, we have a “traditional” meal of turkey with the fixings, pecan, and pumpkin pie. With whipped creme. Yum. No clams or venison for us. Although, my Aunt Jeanette made the best barbeque venison, took me years to agree to try it, I have to admit. Had trouble getting past visions of Disney’s Bambi.

Here is a recipe for a traditional Wampanoag dish – Nasaump. It consists of dried corn pounded in a mortar, and boiled in plain water to a thick porridge. Usually fruits, such as strawberries, raspberries, or blueberries were added. Another variation included clam broth (No, thank you.) with native herbs – green onions, wild garlic.

  • 1 qt water
  • 1 1/2 C coarse grits or hominy
  • Options:
  • 1 C clam broth and 1/2 C chopped green onions OR
  • 1 C fresh strawberries, raspberries, or blueberries
  • I would think you could substitute dried fruits if you didn’t have fresh.

 

Bring the water to a boil in a large pot. Gradually add the hominy, stirring until it comes back to a boil. Turn down the heat to low and cook very gently for 10 minutes, stirring frequently. Remove from the heat and allow to stand one-half to one hour. Before serving, reheat over medium heat, stirring. (If you are adding clam broth and green onions, or fruit, you can do so at this point.) The dish can also be reheated in a covered, buttered baking dish in a 350 degree oven for 45 minutes. You may need to add a bit more water.

File:Porridge oats with blueberries and cinnamon.jpg

photo Wikimedia

There you go. A real traditional Thanksgiving dish. Let’s see how many of you take this to the next church pot luck!

If you do make Nasaump, I’d love to hear about it. I’m thinking of giving it a go. Maybe.

From our house to yours, may you enjoy a wonderful Thanksgiving. Count your blessings, big and small. May each day be a day of thanks, not just a once a year, on the fourth Thursday in November, thing.

Cheer on your favorite team, and be a good sport if they lose. As to which team is better, Pilot and I differ. Hopefully, I won’t be forced to be a good sport.

I wish you well.

Sandy

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