Sunday Scriptures — Delayed Does Not Mean Denied

Isaiahby Sandy Kirby Quandt

The story in the Bible of Queen Esther’s bravery encourages me, but today I’d like to look at a different aspect of the story dealing with her cousin, Mordecai; delayed does not mean denied.

Mordecai overheard a plot to assassinate King Xerxes and notified Esther. She reported the plot to her husband, the king, and gave Mordecai credit for the news. The plot was foiled, the king’s life saved, the assassins hung, and that was the end of it. Although Mordecai’s deed was written in the king’s book of history, no honor or credit was given to Mordecai for his allegiance to King Xerxes.

Fast forward. Haman the Agagite despised Mordecai the Jew because Mordecai would not bow to Haman. Because of that, Haman conspired to wipe the entire Jewish population out, securing the king’s decree to do so, and built a seventy-five foot gallows to hang Mordecai on.

Unable to sleep Xerxes asked for the book of history of his reign to be read to him. When the account of Mordecai saving Xerxes’ life was read, the king asked what honor Mordecai received. None.

If you’re unfamiliar with the rest of the story, the Book of Esther is a short book. Well worth the read. You can find how Mordecai was rewarded in chapter six.

Back to delayed does not mean denied … Mordecai’s reward was delayed according to God’s perfect timing. His reward could not have come at a better time, nor be delivered in a better way.

We may feel as if God’s delay is denying our dream. And it might be. Only God knows that for sure. But it could be like with Mordecai, God is delaying for a more perfect, much better reward.

Are you waiting for a delayed dream? Keep waiting on God’s perfect timing.

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That night the king had trouble sleeping, so he ordered an attendant to bring the book of the history of his reign so it could be read to him.  In those records he discovered an account of how Mordecai had exposed the plot of Bigthana and Teresh, two of the eunuchs who guarded the door to the king’s private quarters. They had plotted to assassinate King Xerxes.

“What reward or recognition did we ever give Mordecai for this?” the king asked.

His attendants replied, “Nothing has been done for him.” Esther 6:1-3 (NLT)

I wish you well.

Sandy

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