Sunday Scriptures — Remember What the Lord Has Done

Isaiahby Sandy Kirby Quandt

The last two Sundays I’ve written about the Israelites entry into the Promised Land that began with their crossing the Jordan River on dry land.

Once all the people crossed the river, God instructed Joshua to set up a memorial to remember what the Lord had done — hold back the waters of the Jordan River to allow the people to cross on dry land.

One person from each of the twelve tribes was chosen to be a part of constructing the memorial. Each man went to the middle of the river where the priest still stood with the Ark of God, chose a large stone from the riverbed, took it back to shore and piled the stones up where the Israelites would camp for the night.

The purpose of the memorial was so when their children asked what the stones were for, the people would remember what the Lord had done, and tell future generations of the day the Jordan River stopped flowing when the Ark of the LORD’s Covenant went across. The stones were to be a memorial to the people forever.

September 13, 2008, Hurricane Ike pummeled our area of Texas. When we returned home after evacuating, we found our house still standing. Yes. We had a lot of outdoor debris to clean up and were out of power for days, but our house still stood. Praise God.

Just like the Israelites, I created a memorial to show what the Lord had done for us. I chose a piece of oak bark about eighteen inches long, the hurricane ripped from one of our trees, and placed it beside our front door.

That bark is still there today. It is a reminder every time I step through my front door of God’s grace and provision, protection and care.

When God brings us through something, it is good to never forget it, so we are able to tell others what the Lord has done.

How do you remember what the Lord has done for you?

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He told them, “Go into the middle of the Jordan, in front of the Ark of the Lord your God. Each of you must pick up one stone and carry it out on your shoulder—twelve stones in all, one for each of the twelve tribes of Israel. We will use these stones to build a memorial. In the future your children will ask you, ‘What do these stones mean?’  Then you can tell them, ‘They remind us that the Jordan River stopped flowing when the Ark of the Lord’s Covenant went across.’ These stones will stand as a memorial among the people of Israel forever.”  Joshua 4:5-7 (NLT)

I wish you well.

Sandy

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Pause for Poetry — The Power of Words

by Sandy Kirby Quandt

Welcome to Pause for Poetry featuring a poem written by my writer-friend, Frances Gregory Pasch.

Words!

Sometimes we speak them hastily

and regret it.

Other times we remain silent

and wish we had spoken.

Words come in all sizes…

many are small, yet dynamic.

Others are big,

but of little importance.

We can change lives by what we say…

either for good or for bad.

Our words can make people laugh

or make them cry.

Words can build them up

or bring them down…

Pull them closer

or turn them away.

Words can draw pictures…

pretty ones or ugly ones.

They can cut like a knife

or soothe like a salve.

Whether written or spoken,

rehearsed or spontaneous,

words are powerful.

They are easy to come by,

but not easily forgotten.

A good reason to measure them out carefully.

© Frances Gregory Pasch

Frances Gregory Pasch’s devotions and poems have been published hundreds of times in devotional booklets, magazines, and Sunday school papers since 1985. Her writing has also appeared in several dozen compilations. Her book, Double Vision: Seeing God in Everyday Life Through Devotions and Poetry is available on Amazon. Frances has been leading a women’s Christian writers group since 1991 and makes her own holiday greeting cards incorporating her poetry. She and her husband, Jim, have been married since 1958. They have five sons and nine grandchildren. Contact her at www.francesgregorypasch.com.

I’d love to hear your thoughts on the subject. Leave a comment below. If you think others would appreciate reading this please share it through the social media buttons.

I wish you well.

Sandy

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Trust God, Not Chariots

courtesy pixabayby Sandy Kirby Quandt

Trust. Assured reliance on the character, ability, strength, or truth of someone or something. One in which confidence is placed. That’s how Webster’s dictionary defines the word.

Throughout history God gives his people a choice. Trust God. Trust man. We will all give an account for where we placed our trust. We need to choose wisely between the two.

Some may try to set themselves above God, but God alone is LORD.

Some trust in power. Some trust in wealth. Some trust in their work. Some trust in status.

In reading the history of the nation of Israel recorded in the Old Testament, we see people who trusted in all of those things. We also see the reliance of many nations upon their military might and weaponry.

Many of those nations did not trust God, and did not rely upon him. Those who relied on their own devices usually failed, unless God used their victory for his own purposes. Those who trusted God and relied on him usually succeeded, unless God used their defeat as punishment.

courtesy pixabay

Those who did not trust God trusted their chariots and horses. They trusted their weapons of iron. They trusted their enormous numbers. They trusted in the fear their name produced.

Time and again we see that God is not interested in chariots, weapons, numbers, or pedigree. God is interested in obedience and trust in him.

The God who raises up, also tears down. Despite what some may say, God still reigns on his throne. God is still El Elyon, the God most high. God is still above all. Everything is still under him.

courtesy pixabay

We would be wise to make sure we place our trust in God and God alone.

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Some trust in chariots, others in horses, but we trust the Lord our God. Psalm 20:7 (NCV)

I wish you well,

Sandy

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Gluten-free Chili Rellenos Recipe

by Sandy Kirby Quandt

This super simple gluten-free Chili Rellenos recipe is not only easy to prepare, it is delicious.

  • 10 oz can whole green chilies
  • 2 cups shredded Cheddar cheese
  • 1/4 cup salsa, optional
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1/4 cup gluten-free Bisquick

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Lightly grease 8″ X 8″ baking dish.

Open chili peppers lengthwise and remove seeds.

Lay chili peppers flat in baking dish, and sprinkle with shredded cheese. If desired, add salsa over cheese.

In mixing bowl, lightly beat egg with fork. Add milk and gluten-free Bisquick. Stir.

Pour mixture over peppers and cheese.

Bake 30 minutes, or until puffy and golden.

chilies-rellenos

Enjoy!

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I wish you well.

Sandy

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Sunday Scriptures — Obedience Demonstrates Trust

Isaiahby Sandy Kirby Quandt

Continuing with the familiar story of Joshua and the defeat of Jericho found in Joshua 6 that I wrote about last Sunday, I’d like to look at the fact obedience demonstrates trust.

Last year I wrote that obedience was a huge part of the Jericho victory. God gave the Israelites victory over their enemies when they trusted and obeyed him. Simple as that.

The same goes for us today. Saying we believe God is one thing, stepping out in faith, trusting, and obeying God’s will, is something else.

In this story, the priests carried the Ark of the Covenant with them into battle. When Joshua and the Israelites got to the flooded Jordan River, Joshua 3:14-17 tells us as soon as the priests’ feet touched the water’s edge, the water upstream stopped flowing.

They had to step into liquid before they could cross on dry ground.

Remember, most of these men had lived their whole life in the desert. I’m pretty sure they didn’t know how to swim. Yet in obedience, they did as the LORD commanded. They stood in the middle of the Jordan River.

Joshua 3:15-16 tells us it was harvest season and the Jordan River was overflowing its banks. But as soon as the priests’ feet touched the water at the river’s edge, the water began backing up and the river bed became dry.

Did you get that? The Jordan was at flood stage, overflowing its banks. This was not a small trickling flow of water, to be sure.

In our lives God may call us to situations that are as daunting as the flooded banks of a raging river. When we reach that river, will we step out in faith, in obedience, and demonstrate our trust, or not?

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It was the harvest season, and the Jordan was overflowing its banks. But as soon as the feet of the priests who were carrying the Ark touched the water at the river’s edge, the water above that point began backing up a great distance away at a town called Adam, which is near Zarethan. And the water below that point flowed on to the Dead Sea until the riverbed was dry. Then all the people crossed over near the town of Jericho. Joshua 3:15-16 (NLT)

I wish you well.

Sandy

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For the Record Book Review

for-the-record book reviewby Sandy Kirby Quandt

For the Record is Regina Jennings’ latest Christian Historical Romance set in Pine Gap, Missouri in 1885. Although is it the third book in her Ozark Mountain Romance series, you don’t need to read the first two books before you read this one. I didn’t.

Betsy Huckabee is a nosy small town reporter in Pine Gap, Missouri with dreams of becoming self-sufficient by writing for big name city newspapers, instead of working at her uncle’s local paper. When Deputy Joel Puckett leaves Texas, due to false accusations, and is sent by the state of Missouri to straighten out the problems in Pine Gap, he runs up against a retiring sheriff who resents Joel taking over his job, a group of masked vigilantes who are sworn to delivering their own brand of justice in the town, and Betsy who is determined to follow the Deputy so she can fictionalize his actions with hopes of selling them in a serial for ladies in the Kansas City paper.

The sensationalized story of the Dashing Deputy has repercussions Betsy didn’t foresee, and Joel didn’t want, leaving a tangled mess to sort out as Joel, with Betsy’s help, struggles to uphold the law among the masked Hob Knobbers of Pine Gap.

Have you read this book? If so, what was your impression of it?

I’d love to hear your thoughts on the subject. Leave a comment below. If you think others would appreciate reading this please share it through the social media buttons.

I wish you well.

Sandy

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Bethany House Publishers provided me with a complimentary copy of this book for a fair and honest review, which is exactly what I gave.